November 2021 Decision Summary Document

November 16-19, 21-22, 2021 

Council Meeting Decision Summary Documents are highlights of significant decisions made at Council meetings.  Results of agenda items that do not reach a level of highlight significance are typically not described in the Decision Summary Document.  For a more detailed account of Council meeting discussions, see the Council meeting record and transcripts or the Council newsletter.

Habitat Issues

Current Habitat Issues 

The Council considered the Supplemental Habitat Committee Report, and agreed that comment letters may be appropriate in response to upcoming comment opportunities on the Nordic Aquafarms Environmental Impact Review (EIR) and the Klamath Dam Removal EIR using the quick response approval process, if comment periods do not encompass a Council meeting. 

Groundfish Management

Adopt Stock Assessments

The Council adopted new stock assessments and rebuilding analyses endorsed by the Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) as follows:

These assessments and rebuilding analyses will inform Council and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) management decisions affecting fisheries in 2023 and beyond. 

Harvest Specifications for 2023-2024 Including Final Overfishing Limits and Acceptable Biological Catches

The Council adopted 2023 and 2024 harvest specifications for groundfish stocks and stock complexes under default harvest control rules.  Additionally, the Council adopted a range of alternative harvest specifications for select stocks for detailed analysis (as provided in GMT Presentation 1), including preliminary preferred alternatives (PPA) as follows:

  • Sablefish (coastwide): Alternative 1, annual catch limit (ACL) = acceptable biological catch (ABC), P* 0.4
  • Lingcod north of 40° 10’ N. lat.: Alternative 1, ACL = ABC, P* 0.45
  • Lingcod south of 40° 10’ N. lat.: Alternative 1, ACL = ABC, P* 0.45
  • Oregon black rockfish: Alternative 1, ACL = ABC = 512 mt
  • Pacific spiny dogfish: no PPA at this time
  • Vermilion/sunset rockfish in California south of Pt. Conception: No Action, ACL = ABC, P* 0.45
  • Vermilion/sunset rockfish in California north of Pt. Conception: No Action, ACL = ABC, P* 0.45
  • Vermilion rockfish in Oregon: No Action, ACL = ABC, P* 0.45
  • Vermilion rockfish in Washington: No Action, ACL = ABC, P* 0.45

The Council also removed quillback rockfish off California from the Nearshore Rockfish complexes north and south of 40° 10’ N. lat. to facilitate the development of a rebuilding plan given the assessment result that the stock is considered overfished.  The Council selected a range of California quillback rockfish rebuilding harvest rate alternatives from the quillback rockfish rebuilding analysis under spawning potential ratios of 1.0 (i.e., F=0), 0.7, 0.6, and 0.5, including a “ramp down” strategy which would reduce catch over a 3-year period. No PPA has been identified at this time.

The Council is scheduled to adopt final 2023 and 2024 harvest specifications at their April 2022 meeting.  

Preliminary Exempted Fishing Permit Approval for 2023-2024

Also adopted were a combined 100 salmon cap for both of the non-trawl EFPs and the salmon caps recommended the year-round midwater trawl EFP.

Biennial Management Measures for 2023-2024

The Council adopted a range of alternatives (ROA) for routine management measures necessary to implement the 2023-24 harvest specifications as recommended by the Groundfish Management Team (GMT) in their three supplemental reports 1, 2, and 3, the Groundfish Advisory Subpanel, and the Tribal reports 1 and 2.  Further, the Council adopted a recommendation from California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) as part of the ROA that would correct inaccuracies in current depth contour waypoints off of California. 

The Council made several decisions regarding management measure alternatives that include: 

  • Removal an option from analysis that would prohibit a directed fishery for shortbelly rockfish from this management period and instead develop this measure in a separate Council action. 
  • Amending the Groundfish Fishery Management Plan to include specific language indicating that if shortbelly rockfish catch exceeds, or is projected to exceed, 2,000 mt in a calendar year, that a review process would be initiated by the Council to reconsider the stock’s designation as an ecosystem component species. 
  • Recommendations for development of annual catch targets for copper and quillback rockfishes, a ‘ramp down’ rebuilding strategy for quillback rockfish, and exploration of updating depth-dependent mortality rates for copper, quillback, and vermillion rockfishes. 
  • A new management measure that would allow for commercial fishing within the existing Non-trawl Rockfish Conservation Area using non-bottom contact hook-and-line gears. 
  • A new management measure that would change the LEFG primary (tier) sablefish season end data from October 31 to December 31.

Non-trawl Sector Area Management Measures

The Council adopted a revised purpose and need statement and a range of alternatives for the development of non-trawl area management measures. 

Revised Purpose and Need Statement:

“The purpose of these proposed actions is to provide access to additional areas that are currently closed to groundfish fishing inside the Non-Trawl Rockfish Conservation Area (RCA) and Cowcod Conservation Area (CCA). The Non-Trawl sector is presently unable to access many target species where they are most abundant. The actions are needed to provide increased access to non-overfished shelf rockfish stocks and other important target stocks that can be found in the existing non-trawl groundfish conservation areas (GCAs), thereby increasing the overall potential economic value of the groundfish fishery.  The actions are also needed to help diversify fishing strategies in light of restrictive opportunities in other groundfish and non-groundfish fisheries, and to provide more stable, year-round fishing opportunity, expand opportunities to supply seafood, and increase potential financial benefit to fishermen, communities, and the infrastructures they support. The additional access might be provided by actions such as 1) moving and/or modifying the existing Non-Trawl RCA and/or CCA boundaries, and/or 2) allowing groundfish fishing inside the Non-Trawl RCA and/or CCA using only select gears that minimize bottom contact.”

Range of Alternatives that would apply between 34° 27’– 46° 16’ North Latitude:

Alternative 1: Allow Open Access (OA) vessels targeting groundfish to fish in the non-trawl RCA (NT_RCA) using approved hook-and-line gear

  • Allow OA vessels targeting groundfish to operate inside the NT_RCA with hook-and-line gear except bottom longline, vertical hook-and-line that is anchored to the bottom, and dinglebar gear are types of hook-and-line gear that are not allowed. Fixed gear types other than hook-and-line are not allowed.  Vessels must declare their intent to fish within the NT_RCA prior to departure. 
  • Fishing Area: Vessels may fish inside and outside the NT_RCA on the same trip.
  • Gear On-Board: Vessels shall only carry approved hook-and-line gear on-board vessels when fishing occurs in the NT_RCA.

Alternative 2: Allow Limited Entry Fixed Gear (LEFG) vessels targeting groundfish to fish in the NT_RCA using approved hook-and-line gear up to LEFG trip limits

  • Allow LEFG vessels targeting groundfish to operate inside the NT_RCA and fish up to the LEFG trip limits with hook-and-line gear except that bottom longline, vertical hook-and-line that is anchored to the bottom, and dinglebar gear are not allowed. Fixed gear types other than hook-and-line are also not allowed.  Vessels must declare their intent to fish within the NT_RCA prior to departure. 
  • Fishing Area:  LEFG vessels may fish inside and outside the NT_RCA on a trip.
  • Gear On-Board:  LEFG vessels can only carry approved hook-and-line gear on-board a vessel when fishing occurs in the NT_RCA. Vessels shall not switch gears during a fishing trip.

Alternative 3: Reconfiguration of NT_RCA boundaries

  • The seaward NT_RCA boundary will be 75 fathoms
  • Suboption 1: Prohibit all bottom contact groundfish gear in groundfish EFH Conservation Areas that would otherwise be reopened under this action

Alternative 4: Remove the NT_RCA

  • Suboption 1: Prohibit all bottom contact groundfish gear in groundfish EFHCAs that would otherwise be reopened under this action

Alternative 5: Repeal the Cowcod Conservation Areas For Commercial and Recreational Fisheries

The following alternative is specific to the area off Washington (north of 46° 16’ N. latitude)

Alternative 6: Open Limited Areas of the Non-trawl RCA to Pot Gear Only

  • The open areas would be generally located seaward of the 75 fm line but may be defined by coordinates that do not necessarily follow a single depth contour. This alternative will be refined in the future to ensure the open areas would satisfy the following objectives:
    • Allow only minimal increases of yelloweye bycatch.
    • Avoid direct and indirect conflicts with recreational and other fisheries currently fishing within 100 fm.
    • Avoid impacts to sensitive habitats.
    • Are distinct enough from the 100 fm seaward boundary to be enforceable by the existing Vessel Monitoring System.

Inseason Adjustments Including Pacific Whiting Set-Asides for 2022 — Final Action

The Council considered inseason adjustments to the 2021 and 2022 groundfish management measures.  The Council did not recommend any inseason changes for the remainder of 2021, but adopted the following inseason adjustments for 2022:

Fixed Gear (2022)

  • The OA Fixed Gear Lingcod North of 42° North Latitude (N. Lat.) trip limit will be set at 2,500 lb./month
  • The OA fixed gear daily trip limit (DTL) Sablefish North of 36° N. Lat. will be set at 600 lbs./day, or 1 landing/week up to 2,000 lbs., not to exceed 4,000 lbs./2 months
  • The LEFG Lingcod North of 42° N. Lat. trip limit will be set at 5,000 lb./2 months.
  • The LEFG DTL Sablefish North of 36˚ N. Lat. trip limit will be set at 2,400 lb./week, not to exceed 4,800 lb./2 months

Set Asides (2022)

The Council recommended a 750 metric ton 2022 Pacific whiting set-aside for research activities and the pink shrimp fishery.

Fisheries off California (2022) 

Quillback Rockfish:

  • A one (1) fish quillback rockfish sub-bag limit in the California recreational fishery
  • Minor nearshore rockfish trip limits between 42°- 40° 10’ N. lat. will be 2,000 lbs / 2 months, of which no more than 75 lbs can be quillback rockfish.
  • Deeper nearshore rockfish sub-trip limits south of 40° 10’ N. lat. will be 2,000 lbs / 2 months, of which no more than 75 lbs can be quillback rockfish.

Copper Rockfish:

  • A one (1) fish copper rockfish sub-bag limit in the California recreational fishery
  • Minor nearshore rockfish trip limits between 42°- 40° 10’ N. lat. will be 2,000 lbs / 2 months, of which no more than 75 lbs can be copper rockfish.
  • Deeper nearshore rockfish sub-trip limits south of 40° 10’ N. lat. will be 2,000 lbs / 2 months, of which no more than 75 lbs can be copper rockfish.

Vermilion/Sunset Rockfish:

  • A four (4) fish vermilion rockfish sub-bag limit in the California recreational fishery

Salmon Management

Final Methodology Review

The Council adopted the forecast methodology for Willapa Bay natural coho for implementation in 2022 and beyond consistent with the methodology described in the STT report and supported by the WDFW analytic report

2022 Preseason Management Schedule

The Council approved the 2022 salmon management schedule including the tentative dates and locations for public hearings, acknowledging changes may occur due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and public health and safety concerns.

Southern Oregon/Northern California Coast Coho Endangered Species Act Harvest Control Rule – Final Action

The Council adopted for recommendation to NMFS a new harvest control rule (HCR) for Southern Oregon/Northern California Coast (SONCC) coho that is a fixed total (ocean and freshwater) exploitation rate (ER) of 15 percent with the following implementation criteria:

  1. The postseason average total ER is determined by averaging the annual postseason exploitation rates, which is the sum of the fishery exploitation rates experienced in the year across all ocean and inland sources of fishery mortality, over the available postseason record for the period following this HCR adoption. The average must not exceed 15 percent. 
  2. Postseason estimates of the ocean ER will be generated using the Coho Fishery Regulation Assessment Model (FRAM), whereas the in-river ER component will be determined using data provided by co-managing agencies as described in Appendix C and Appendix I of the risk assessment report.
  3. Ocean fishery seasons shall be designed pre-season each year such that Coho FRAM projections of ocean fishery impacts to SONCC coho salmon do not exceed 9 percent more frequently than once every four years.

Pacific Halibut Management

Commercial-Directed Fishery Regulations for 2022 – Final Action

The Council adopted for recommendation to the International Pacific Halibut Commission a season structure for 2022 that is similar to 2021 and consists of a series of three-day openings, beginning at 8 a.m. on the fourth Tuesday in June and ending at 6 p.m. on the Thursday of that week. Additional three-day openings would occur every other week, Tuesday through Thursday, until the directed fishery allocation is obtained.

2022 Catch Sharing Plan and Annual Regulations – Final Action

The Council adopted for recommendation to NMFS changes to the Catch Sharing Plan and annual fishing regulations for 2022 consistent with the recommendations on recreational fisheries provided by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The recommended Daily Bag Limit change will apply to the Southern Oregon Subarea in addition to the Central Oregon Coast Subarea.

Highly Migratory Species Management

International Management Activities

The Council made recommendations to NMFS on domestic management measures implementing 2022-2024 catch limits for Pacific bluefin tuna in IATTC Resolution C-21-05,which increases the 2021-2022 biennial catch limit to 739 mt (no more than 523 mt in 2022) and includes an increased 2023-2024 biennial catch limit of 1,017 mt (no more than 720 mt in any one year). The Council recommended trip limit regimes for each year similar to what is in place in 2021, with trip limit reductions tied to catch attainment during the year. For 2024, the Council recommended a range of cumulative catch limit triggers for trip limit reductions, depending on the actual 2024 catch limit (currently uncertain because it is the second year in the biennium). NMFS will go through rulemaking to implement the trip limits for all three years.

The Council endorsed the recommendations of the Permanent Advisory Committee to the U.S. Section of the Western and Central Pacific Commission for consideration in developing U.S. positions at the 18th Regular Session of the WCPFC. Ms. Christa Svensson, WCPFC Commissioner in the Pacific Council designated seat, will advance positions in the U.S. delegation, as appropriate.

Drift Gillnet Fishery Hard Caps

The Council adopted the following range of alternatives for drift gillnet hard caps. 

Alternative 1: No action

Alternative 2: The original 2015 Council preferred alternative for rolling 2-year hard caps

Alternative 3: A combination of individual and fleetwide annual (“fishing year”: April 1-March 31) caps based on Table 1, below. Caps are based on observed interactions (serious injury/mortality), regardless of the level of observer coverage. In all cases, “ceasing fishing” shall be applied both inside and outside the U.S. EEZ. Closures are contiguous, even if they extend into, or beyond, an existing closure.

Option A: 

If a vessel reaches an individual cap, that vessel and all unobservable vessels cease fishing for:

Sub-option I: 30 days if the cap is reached before November 1, or 14 days if the cap is reached between November 1 and January 31

Sub-option II: For the remainder of the fishing year

If a fleetwide cap is reached, the entire fleet ceases fishing for the remainder of the fishing year

Option B

If a vessel reaches an individual cap, that vessel and all unobservable vessels cease fishing for 30 days if the cap is reached before November 1, or 14 days if the cap is reached between November 1 and January 31

If a vessel exceeds an individual cap, that vessel and all unobservable vessels cease fishing for the remainder of the fishing year

If a fleetwide cap is exceeded, the entire fleet ceases fishing for the remainder of the fishing year

Option C:

If a vessel reaches an individual hard cap, that vessel and all unobservable vessels cease fishing for 30 days if the cap is reached before November 1, or 14 days if the cap is reached between November 1 and January 31

If a vessel exceeds an individual cap, that vessel and all unobservable vessels cease fishing for the remainder of the fishing year, AND the remainder of the fleet ceases fishing for 30 days if the cap is exceeded before November 1, or 14 days if the cap is exceeded between November 1 and January 31

If a fleetwide cap is reached, the entire fleet ceases fishing for 30 days if the cap is reached before November 1, or 14 days if the cap is reached between November 1 and January 31

If a fleetwide cap is exceeded, the entire fleet ceases fishing until:

Sub-option I: the beginning of the following fishing year

Sub-option II: The following November 1, with cap counts beginning November 1 each year

Table 1. Individual and fleetwide hard caps. Values that EXCEED the individual or fleetwide caps are in parenthesis.

SpeciesIndividual Cap
(exceedance)
Fleetwide Cap(exceedance)
Fin whale1 (2)2 (3)
Humpback whale1 (2)2 (3)
Sperm whale1 (2)2 (3)
Leatherback sea turtle1 (2)2 (3)
Loggerhead sea turtle1 (2)2 (3)
Olive-Ridley sea turtle1 (2)2 (3)
Green sea turtle1 (2)2 (3)
Short-fin pilot whale C/O/W3 (4)4 (5)
Common bottlenose dolphin C/O/W Offshore stock3 (4)4 (5)

The Council directed the Highly Migratory Species Management Team to analyze these alternatives for their relative ability to meet the Council’s stated purpose and need, their relative potential economic impacts to DGN permit holders, and their relative potential to reduce incidental catch of protected species. Each alternative should be analyzed with the addition of DSBG as a potential alternative gear during closure periods.

Coastal Pelagic Species Management

Preliminary Review of New Exempted Fishing Permits for 2022 

The Council approved three exempted fishing permit (EFP) proposals for public review: two that addressed biological sampling of ongoing EFPs, and one that addressed aerial survey point sets. The Council is scheduled to make its final EFP recommendations at the April 2022 meeting.

Fishery Management Plan Management Categories

The Council adopted the preliminary fishery management plan (FMP) amendatory language in CPSMT Report 1 for public review, with final Council action to be scheduled for April 2022. The Council also directed the Coastal Pelagic Species Management Team to explore adding text into the FMP language to reference Council Operating Procedure 9 and the Coastal Pelagic Species Stock Assessment and Fishery Evaluation document.

Administrative Matters

Marine Planning 

The Council discussed several Marine Planning related issues, considered the Marine Planning Committee (MPC) Report, and approved the following actions:

  • Send the draft letter to the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) on the Oregon offshore wind energy planning process with minor editorial modifications;
  • Develop and send a cover letter and suggested attachments on BOEM research priorities, including the Council’s Research and Data Needs Document and previous comments on study needs related to offshore wind development and planning activities;
  • Submit comments  on Executive Order 14008 “America the Beautiful” emphasizing the management actions and existing regulatory mechanisms available to the Council that protect and conserve important fisheries and ecosystem resources;
  • Develop and send a cover letter on the United States Coast Guard Port Access Route Study including suggested language from Supplemental HMSAS Report 1 and Supplemental GAP Report 1, and attach three prior letters on offshore wind energy sent in September and October;
  • Initiate a letter to BOEM in response to the pending comment opportunity on the Morro Bay Wind Energy Area Environmental Assessment notice for comment, under the quick response approval process;
  • Task the MPC, the Ecosystem Workgroup, and the Habitat Committee with developing a draft policy document on offshore development activities for Council consideration in March 2022, including considerations of impacts to fisheries, the ecosystem, and essential fish habitat.

The Council also encouraged Council Advisory Bodies to familiarize themselves with the NOAA Aquaculture Opportunity Areas Atlas for Southern California, in anticipation of a Notice of Intent on a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement expected for early 2022. 

Final Regional Operating Agreement

The Council approved an updated Operating Agreement among the Council, NMFS West Coast Region, the Northwest and Southwest Fisheries Science Centers, Office of Law Enforcement, and Northwest and Southwest NOAA General Counsels

Preliminary West Coast Regional Framework for Determining the Best Scientific Information Available

The Council considered the NMFS draft regional framework for determining best scientific information available, and requested the NMFS West Coast Region consider the comments and recommendations provided by the Scientific and Statistical Committee and the Salmon Technical Team.  The policy directive requires the Best Scientific Information Available framework be completed by May 7, 2022, and the Council has tentatively scheduled this item on their April 2022 agenda.

Fiscal Matters

The Council approved a 2022 Provisional Budget of $6,056,028 for use beginning January 1, and recommended scheduling a Budget Committee meeting in March 2022 to discuss staff’s list of initiatives with associated costs and impacts on the Council’s budget.

Legislative Matters

The Council approved the Council Coordination Committee draft consensus statements to be incorporated into the CCC Working Paper on Magnuson-Stevens Act Reauthorization Issues 

Standardized Bycatch Reporting Methodology – Final Action

The Council completed its consistency review and adopted fishery management plan (FMP) amendment language for the Pacific Salmon, Coastal Pelagic Species, and Highly Migratory Species FMPs to bring them into compliance with NMFS standardized bycatch reporting methodology (SBRM) final rule. The Council also reaffirmed that the Groundfish FMP is consistent with the final rule and no amendment is necessary. The Council will transmit the consistency-review package, including FMP amendment language and rationale to NMFS for a final consistency determination.

Membership Appointments and Council Operating Procedures 

The Council appointed Dr. Kate Richerson to the NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center position on the Groundfish Management Team formerly held by Dr. Kayleigh Somers.

The Council also made the following Advisory Body appointments for the 2022-2024 term:

Coastal Pelagic Species Advisory Subpanel

California Commercial Fisheries

       Mr. David Crabbe

       Mr. David Haworth

       Mr. Nick Jurlin

Oregon Commercial Fisheries

       Mr. Ryan Kapp

Washington Commercial Fisheries

       Mr. Michael Cornman

Processor (3 Positions)

       Mr. Brian Blake

       Mr. Mike Okoniewski

       Mr. Anthony Vuoso

California Sport/Charter Fisheries

       Mr. Steve Crooke

Conservation Group

       Ms. Anna Weinstein  

Ecosystem Advisory Subpanel

California

       Ms. Melissa Mahoney

       Mr. Richard Ogg

       Ms. Deborah Wilson-Vandenberg

Oregon

       Mr. Scott McMullen

Ms. Gway Rogers-Kirchner

       Dr. Andrew Thurber

Washington 

       Dr. Terrie Klinger

       Dr. Phillip Levin

       Ms. Michele Robinson

Groundfish Advisory Subpanel

Fixed Gear Fisheries

       Mr. Bob Alverson

       Mr. Scott Hartzell

       Mr. Gerry Richter

Bottom Trawl Fisheries

       Mr. Travis Hunter

Mid-Water Trawl Fisheries

       Mr. Jeff Lackey

At-Large Trawl Fisheries

       Ms. Ruth Christiansen

       Mr. Kevin Dunn

Open Access Fisheries North of Cape Mendocino

       Mr. Harrison Ibach

Open Access Fisheries South of Cape Mendocino

       Mr. Daniel Platt

Processors 

       Ms. Susan Chambers

At-Sea Processor

       Mr. Daniel Waldeck

Washington Charter Boat Operator

       Mr. Steve Westrick

Oregon Charter Boat Operator

       Mr. Jeffrey Wilmarth

California Charter Boat Operator North of Point Conception

       Mr. Tim Klassen

California Charter Boat Operator South of Point Conception

       Mr. Merit McCrea

Sport Fisheries

       Mr. Stephen Godin

       Mr. Louis Zimm

Tribal Fisheries

       Mr. Steve Joner

Conservation Group

       Mr. Shems Jud

Highly Migratory Species Advisory Subpanel

Commercial Troll Fisheries

       Mr. Wayne Heikkila

Commercial Purse Seine Fisheries

       Mr. Michael Conroy

Commercial Gillnet Fisheries

       Mr. Gary Burke

Commercial Deep-Set Buoy Gear

       Mr. William Sutton

Commercial Fisheries North of Point of Conception

       Mr. Douglas Fricke

Commercial Fisheries South of Point of Conception

       Mr. Austen Brown

Processor North of Cape Mendocino

       No appointment at this time

Processor South of Cape Mendocino

       Mr. Dave Rudie

Northern Charter Boat Operator

       Mr. Jon Yokomizo

Southern Charter Boat Operator

       Mr. Mike Thompson

Private Sport Fisheries North of Point Conception

       Mr. Tom Mattusch

Private Sport Fisheries South of Point Conception

       Mr. Robert Osborn

Conservation Group

       Mr. Josh Madeira

Public At-large

       Ms. Pamela Tom

Salmon Advisory Subpanel

Washington Troll Fisheries

       Mr. Ryan Johnson

Oregon Troll Fisheries

       Mr. Darus Peake

California Troll Fisheries

       Mr. George Bradshaw

Gillnet Fisheries

       Mr. Bryce Divine

Processor

       Mr. Gerald Reinholdt

Washington Charter Boat Operator

       Mr. Michael Sawin

Oregon Charter Boat Operator

       Mr. Mike Sorensen

California Charter Boat Operator

       Mr. John Atkinson

Washington Sport Fisheries

       Mr. Dave Johnson

Oregon Sport Fisheries

       Mr. Richard Heap

Idaho Sport Fisheries

       No appointment at this time

California Sport

       Mr. James Stone

       Mr. Jim Yarnall

Tribal Fisheries – Washington Coast

       Mr. Jon Pink

Tribal Representative – California

       Mr. Justin Alvarez

Conservation Group

       Ms. Megan Waters

Scientific and Statistical Committee

At-Large

       Dr. Melissa Haltuch

       Dr. Dan Holland

       Dr. Kristin Marshall

       Dr. Stephan Munch

       Dr. André Punt

       Dr. William Satterthwaite

       Dr. Jason Schaffler

Habitat Committee

Northwest or Columbia River Tribal Representative

       No appointment at this time

California Tribal Representative

       Mr. Barry McCovey

Commercial Fishing Industry

       Mr. Glen Spain

Sport Fishing Industry

       Mr. Timothy Roy

Conservation Group

       Dr. W. Waldo Wakefield

At-large

       Dr. Scott Heppell

       Mr. Stephen Scheiblauer

The following Advisory Body seats for the 2022-2024 term remain vacant, and the Council intends to solicit nominations for these seats over the winter through its Advisory Body Vacancy web page for potential appointment at the March 2022 meeting.

  • One GAP Sport Fisheries At-Large position
  • One GAP At-Large Processor position
  • One SAS Idaho Sport Fisheries position
  • Two SSC At-Large positions with a preference for nominees with expertise in oceanography and/or social sciences
  • One HC Northwest or Columbia River Tribal Representative
  • One HMSAS Processor North of Cape Mendocino position

Council Chair Marc Gorelnik also made the following appointments to Ad Hoc Council committees:

Dr. Kiva Oken was appointed to the NMFS position on the Ad Hoc Ecosystem Workgroup formerly held by Dr. Andi Stephens.

Ad Hoc Groundfish Electronic Monitoring
Policy Advisory Committee

Mr. Phil Anderson (Chair)

Mr. John Corbin

Ms. Lisa Damrosch

Mr. Bob Dooley

Ms. Kate Kauer

Mr. Paul Kujala 

Ms. Melissa Mahoney

Ms. Heather Mann

Mr. Brent Paine

Mr. Ryan Wulff

Ad Hoc Groundfish Electronic Monitoring
Technical Advisory Committee

Capt. Dan Chadwick

Mr. Dave Colpo

Lt. Ryan Howell

Mr. Justin Kavanaugh

Lt. Jason Kraus

Ms. Traci Larinto

Mr. Andrew Torres

Additionally, the Council approved modifications to COP 9, Schedule 3 regarding a framework approach to the management of the central subpopulation of northern anchovy.

Public hearing on salmon management (WA) scheduled for 7pm, Tuesday, March 22, 2022

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Public hearing on salmon management (CA) scheduled for 7pm, Tuesday, March 22, 2022

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Central Subpopulation of Northern Anchovy Stock Assessment Review Panel to be held online December 7-10, 2021

This post was generated by and redirects to https://www.pcouncil.org/events/central-subpopulation-of-northern-anchovy-stock-assessment-review-panel-to-be-held-online-december-7-10-2021/.

The Fishery Ecosystem Plan

In September 2021, the Council adopted the revised draft of the Fishery Ecosystem Plan for public review. The Council is scheduled to adopt the final updated Fishery Ecosystem Plan in March 2022. You may submit comments for consideration at the Council’s March meeting once our public comment portal for that meeting opens.

We envision a thriving and resilient California Current Ecosystem that continues to provide benefits to current and future generations and supports livelihoods, fishing opportunities, and cultural practices that contribute to the wellbeing of fishing communities and the nation.

The California Current Ecosystem is shaped by:

  • Dynamic ocean forces like currents, upwelling, and water temperature; 
  • High biodiversity, with dramatic seasonal shifts in predator and prey populations;
  • Diverse human uses of and priorities for estuaries, coastal communities, and the sea.

The Council uses its Fishery Ecosystem Plan to better understand how environmental variability and change, human activities, and social-ecological dynamics affect the future of the ecosystem.  Developing our understanding of how those interacting forces affect the species and fisheries we manage helps us meet our goals and objectives for the ecosystem.

A science-based natural resource management process must be supported by ongoing scientific research and analyses.  Bringing ecosystem science into the Council process helps us understand how individual species are affected by the environment, and how our wide variety of species interact with each other and the people that depend on them.

The 2013 Fishery Ecosystem Plan

At its April 2013 meeting, the Council adopted the Pacific Coast Fishery Ecosystem Plan for the U.S. Portion of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem (FEP) in 2013. In 2018, the Council initiated a 5-year review and update of the Plan’s contents.

Fishery Ecosystem Plan (July 2013)

PRELIMINARY DRAFT NOVEMBER 2021 MOTIONS IN WRITING

Cautionary Note — These preliminary motions do not represent the final official administrative record. The motions and amendments contained in this blog are as projected on the screen at the Council meeting at the time of the Council vote and often use expedited language and references without the benefit of any final editing or proofing. They may use short-hand language or abbreviations that may not be clear without the context of verbal comments and clarifications made during their development at the meeting, or may contain inadvertent transposition errors. They have not been approved by the Council to represent the final official record of Council action. The final official record will be posted on the Council website after the Council approves the full meeting record at a future Council meeting.