Uncategorized blog

Pacific Council News, Summer 2019: Habitat

Wednesday, July 10th, 2019

Habitat Report

Jordan Cove letter

Jordan Cove Liquified Natural Gas project location near Coos Bay, Oregon

In July the Council sent a letter to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on the proposed Jordan Cove Liquified Natural Gas Terminal and Pipeline, which would transport liquified natural gas (LNG) 229 miles from near Klamath Falls, Oregon to the coastal export terminal in Coos Bay, Oregon for shipping across the Pacific. The Coos Bay project includes two storage tanks, five liquefaction processing structures, vessel loading facilities, a large deepwater vessel slip, LNG carrier vessels, a marine access channel, and supporting infrastructure. On March 29th, FERC issued a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the project.

The proposed pipeline would cross or otherwise impact 352 water bodies, including water bodies that are known to support salmon and other Council-managed stocks. In addition to environmental impacts, a security zone 500 meters wide–equal to the width of the existing navigation channel–will be required around LNG carrier vessels. This could impact all other vessel traffic while carrier vessels are present. FERC estimates 120 carrier vessels will transit the area each year.

Construction will require large-scale channel modification and continuous dredging, and will impact estuarine habitats that are important to several Council-managed species (Chinook and coho salmon, sardine, herring, Pacific sanddabs, English sole, starry flounder, lingcod, and rockfishes), and their prey.

Map of proposed Jordan Cove pipeline (click for larger version)

Fishermen and processors believe that the proposed project is likely to disrupt fishing-related business and offloading activities in the vicinity of the terminal site at Coos Bay. Recreational fishing will also be disrupted in the estuary and streams.

An analysis of the social and economic impacts to Council-managed fisheries due to loss of productive habitats, direct mortality on fish species and prey, disruption of fishing activities and port deliveries has not been conducted, but impacts are likely to be significant.

National Marine Fisheries Service has not yet undertaken an essential fish habitat consultation or developed conservation recommendations for the project. For more details, see the Council letter and the related Oregonian article.

Forest Service Standards

In a related matter, the Habitat Committee discussed the U.S. Forest Service’s forest plan standards, which would need to be amended to accommodate the Jordan Cove pipeline. The standards affect rare species and riparian zones, which are also designated as essential fish habitat. The Council directed the Habitat Committee to draft a letter to the Forest Service on this subject for the September briefing book.

Offshore wind turbines

California Offshore Renewable Energy

Chris Potter from the California Natural Resource Agency/Ocean Protection Council gave a presentation to the Habitat Committee on California offshore renewable energy lease efforts. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management has issued a call for information and nomination for three potential offshore energy leasing areas near Humboldt Bay, Morro Bay, and Diablo Canyon, California. The latter two are understood to be in conflict with Department of Defense operations, but political pressure is being applied to move projects forward despite Defense objections. Currently 14 companies have submitted indications of interest to obtain a commercial lease for a wind energy project.

Coastal Sediment Management

Rising sea levels mean more coastal erosion, which means that beaches need to be restored to protect habitats for many species. These include species that spawn on the beach, such as sand lance, surf smelt, and grunion. In June, the Habitat Committee heard a presentation on sediment management and beach nourishment in California and Washington. In California, the Coastal Sediment Management Workgroup is a collaborative state and Federal effort that has helped develop 14 regional sediment management plans covering the California coast.

In Washington, beach nourishment is being used to restore beaches that are lacking natural sediment. Ninety percent of Puget Sound’s beaches are fed by sediment from eroding bluffs, and a third of these bluffs have shoreline armoring that prevents sediment from moving naturally to the beach. In beach restoration, sediment is placed above the water level on beaches to protect benthic organisms and to allow the sediment to be distributed by coastal processes. At the same time, shoreline armoring is often removed, and large woody debris is added. These efforts can restore surf smelt and sand lance spawning habitat, both of which are prey species for Council-managed species.

Klamath issues

Since April 1, the Bureau of Reclamation has been operating the Klamath Project under a new Biological Opinion (BiOp), which has caused some issues with water management given the mid-year switch. For example, below-average discharge from Iron Gate Dam has left the Klamath with drought-like flows, while every stream around it has above-average discharge. The Yurok Tribe is suing Reclamation over its methods for calculating the block of environmental water (all water not allocated for agriculture).

The levels of Ceratomyxa shasta, a parasite that contributes to fish kills in the Klamath, started climbing in May. A pulse flow was released to flush the spores from the river and to help ensure hatchery fish survival. Initially, only 65 percent of the Iron Gate Hatchery fall Chinook were going to be released, but because of mortality concerns and to capitalize on the pulse flow, California Department of Fish and Wildlife decided to release the last of the Chinook during this pulse as well, despite the fact that the fish were undersized and only 7 percent were marked with coded wire tags, rather than the typical 25 percent.

Return to newsletter

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Southern Resident Killer Whale Workgroup to Hold Webinars August 6 and September 4, 2019

Monday, July 8th, 2019

The Pacific Fishery Management Council’s (Council)  Ad Hoc Southern Resident Killer Whale (SRKW) Workgroup (Workgroup) will convene two webinars, which are open to the public.  The first meeting, to be held via webinar, will convene on Tuesday, August 6, 2019, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT), or until business for the day has been completed. The second meeting, to be held via webinar, will convene Wednesday, September 4, 2019, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. PDT, or until business for the day has been completed.  These are public meetings and not public hearings.  Public comments will be taken at the discretion of the Workgroup co-chairs as time allows.

Purpose of the Meetings

The purpose of the August 6 webinar is to discuss the development of the a draft risk analysis, identify remaining data needs, and follow up on assignments and discussions from the Workgroup’s previous meetings; the September 4 webinar will focus mainly on finalizing the draft risk analysis in preparation for the Council meeting in September in Boise, Idaho.  At both of these meetings, the Workgroup may also discuss work plans, and progress made on assigned tasks related to the Workgroup’s prime objective of reassessing the effects of Council-area ocean salmon fisheries on the Chinook salmon prey base of SRKW.  Although non-emergency issues not contained in the Workgroup meeting agendas may come before the Workgroup for discussion, those issues may not be the subject of formal action during these meetings.

Supplemental Information

At the March 2019 Council meeting, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced plans to reinitiate Endangered Species Act consultation on the effect of Council-area ocean salmon fisheries on SRKW.  NMFS and the Council agreed on a collaborative approach and began establishing work plans and a tentative schedule.  At the April 2019 Council meeting, the Council formed the Workgroup to reassess the effects of Council-area ocean salmon fisheries on the Chinook salmon prey base of SRKW.  The Workgroup has held multiple meetings since their inception.  Materials presented during past Workgroup meetings may be found on the NMFS West Coast Regional website (https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/west-coast/southern-resident-killer-whales-and-fisheries-interaction-workgroup).

To Attend the Webinars

  1. Join the meeting by visiting this link:
    https://www.gotomeeting.com/webinar/join-webinar
  2. Enter the Webinar ID: 687-012-435
  3. Please enter your name and email address (required)
  4. You must use your telephone for the audio portion of the meeting by dialing this TOLL number +1 (631) 992-3221 (not a toll-free number)
  5. Then enter the Attendee phone audio access code 972-015-065
  6. Then enter your audio phone pin (shown after joining the webinar)

NOTE: We have disabled Mic/Speakers as on option and require all participants to use a telephone or cell phone to participate.

Technical Information

System Requirements

  • PC-based attendees: Required: Windows® 10, 8, 7, Vista, or XP
  • Mac®-based attendees: Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer
  • Mobile attendees: Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet (See the GoToMeeting Webinar Apps)

You may send an email to Mr.Kris Kleinschmidt or contact him at 503-820-2280, extension 411 for technical assistance.

Public Listening Station

A public listening station will also be provided at the Council office.

Pacific Fishery Management Council
7700 NE Ambassador Place, Suite 101
Portland, OR 97220-1384
503-820-2280
Driving Directions

Additional information

This meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt at 503-820-2411 at least ten days prior to the meeting date. If you have additional questions regarding the webinar, please contact Ms. Robin Ehlke at 503-820-2410; toll free 1-866-806-7204.

 

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Ad Hoc Sablefish Management and Trawl Allocation Attainment Committee to Meet May 21-22, 2019 in Portland, OR

Monday, April 22nd, 2019

The Pacific Fishery Management Council’s ad hoc Sablefish Management and Trawl Allocation Attainment Committee (SaMTAAC) will hold a two-day meeting that is open to the public.  The meeting will begin Tuesday, May 21, 2019 at 8 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time and recess when business for the day is completed.  It will continue at 8 a.m. Wednesday, May 22, adjourning when business for the day is completed.

At its meeting, the SaMTAAC will continue to develop alternatives that address obstacles to achieving the goals and objectives of the groundfish trawl catch share plan related to under-attainment of non-sablefish shorebased trawl allocations and unharvested sablefish quota pounds south of 36° N. latitude.   The SaMTAAC’s work on alternatives will be presented at the September 2019 Pacific Council meeting.

Meeting Materials

Meeting Location

This meeting will be held at the following location:

Sheraton Portland Airport
Mt. Adams Room
8235 NE Airport Way
Portland, OR 97220
Telephone: 503-281-2500
Driving Directions

Additional Information

The meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt at 503-820-2411, at least ten business days prior to the meeting date.

For further information, please contact Dr. Jim Seger at (503) 820-2416; or toll-free 1-866-806-7204, ext. 416.

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Public Comment Deadline: April 2019 E-Portal

Thursday, March 14th, 2019

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

2018 West Coast Salmon Season Dates Set

Wednesday, April 11th, 2018

Portland, Or. – This week the Pacific Fishery Management Council adopted ocean salmon season recommendations that provide recreational and commercial opportunities for most of the Pacific coast, and achieve conservation goals for the numerous individual salmon stocks on the West Coast.

The recommendation will be forwarded to the National Marine Fisheries Service for approval by May 1, 2018.

“It has been another challenging year for the Council, its advisors, fishery stakeholders and the public as we strive to balance fishing opportunities with the conservation needs we are facing on Chinook and coho salmon stocks, both north and south of Cape Falcon,” said Council Executive Director Chuck Tracy. “The Council has recommended ocean salmon seasons on the west coast this year that provide important protections for stocks of concern, including Lower Columbia River natural fall Chinook, Puget Sound Chinook, Washington coastal coho, and Sacramento River fall Chinook.”

“This year’s package includes some very restrictive seasons in both commercial and recreational fisheries along the entire coast. Low abundances of Chinook and coho are in part due to the poor ocean conditions the adult fish faced as juveniles when they entered the ocean, and poor in-river habitat and water conditions. Tribal, commercial, and recreational fishers continue to bear a large part of the burden of conservation,” said Council Chair Phil Anderson.

Washington and Northern Oregon (North of Cape Falcon)

Fisheries north of Cape Falcon (near Nehalem in northern Oregon) depend largely on Columbia River Chinook and coho stocks. Overall, Columbia River fall Chinook forecasts are considered low to moderate compared to the recent 10-year average. Hatchery coho stocks originating from the Columbia River together with natural stocks originating from the Queets River and Grays Harbor are expected to return at low levels resulting in very low harvest quotas as was the case in 2017.

North of Cape Falcon, the overall non-Indian total allowable catch is 55,000 Chinook coastwide (compared to 90,000 last year) and 47,600 marked hatchery coho (the same as last year). Fisheries are designed to provide harvest opportunity on healthy Chinook returns primarily destined for the Columbia River, while avoiding coho stocks of concern.

Commercial Fisheries

Non-Indian ocean commercial fisheries north of Cape Falcon include traditional, but reduced, Chinook seasons in the spring (May-June) and summer season (July through mid-September). Non-Indian ocean commercial fisheries in this area will have access to a total of 27,500 Chinook (compared to 45,000 Chinook last year), and a marked coho quota of 5,600 (the same as last year).

Tribal ocean fisheries north of Cape Falcon are similar in structure to past years, with quotas that include 40,000 Chinook and 12,500 coho (the same as last year).

Recreational Fisheries

The recreational fishery north of Cape Falcon opens to all salmon on June 23 in most areas (July 1 in Westport) and ends September 3 or when Chinook or coho quotas are reached. Recreational fisheries in this area will have access to total of 27,500 Chinook (compared to 45,000 Chinook last year), and a marked coho quota of 42,000 (the same as last year).

California and Oregon South of Cape Falcon, Oregon

Fisheries south of Cape Falcon (in northern Oregon) are constrained primarily by Klamath River fall Chinook, Sacramento River fall Chinook and Oregon Coastal Natural coho. The commercial fishery consists of modest Chinook fisheries, particularly in California. Recreational fisheries in Oregon contain both Chinook and coho opportunity, with coho opportunity including both mark-selective and non-mark-selective fisheries.

Commercial Fisheries

Commercial fisheries from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. will open on May 4 and will and continue through August 29 with intermittent closures. This area will also be open continuously in September and October, with weekly limits and a depth restriction in October.

Fisheries from Humbug Mt, Oregon to Humboldt South Jetty, California will be open intermittently from May through August. Monthly quotas will be in place for the Oregon portion of the Klamath Management Zone (KMZ) from June through August. In the California portion of the KMZ, monthly Chinook quotas will be in place from May through August. The quotas all feature landing and possession limits, and the Californian portion of this area will be open five days a week.

Between Horse Mountain and Pigeon Point (Fort Bragg and San Francisco areas), the area will be open for a week in late July, most of August and all of September. From Pigeon Point to the Mexico border (Monterey), the Chinook season will be open during the first week in May and the last two weeks of June. There will also be a season from Point Reyes to Point San Pedro (subset of the San Francisco area), consisting of two five-day periods in October.

Recreational Fisheries

Recreational fisheries from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt will allow Chinook retention from now through October. Coho fisheries consist of a mark-selective quota fishery of 35,000 in mid-summer (compared to 18,000 last year) and a non-mark-selective quota fishery of 3,500 in September (compared to 6,000 last year).

Fisheries from Humbug Mt, Oregon to the Oregon/California border will be open from mid-May through late August. The area from the Oregon/California border to Horse Mountain, California will be open from June through Labor Day.

Fisheries from Horse Mountain to Pigeon Point (Fort Bragg and San Francisco areas) will be open from mid-June through October. The area from Pigeon Point to the U.S./Mexico border (Monterey area) is open now through early July.

For details on all seasons, please see the season descriptions on the Council website at http://www.pcouncil.org.

Management Process

The Council developed three management alternatives in early March for public review and further analysis. The review process included input from federal, state, and tribal fishery scientists and fishing industry members; public testimony, and three public hearings in coastal communities. The Council received additional scientific information and took public testimony at its April Council meeting before taking final action. The decision will be forwarded to the National Marine Fisheries Service for their review of consistency with the Endangered Species Act and other applicable law, and promulgation of federal regulations.

In addition, the coastal states will take independent actions through state processes that will include adoption of fishery regulations under state authority that are compatible to the Council’s actions and include state water fisheries.

Council Role

The Pacific Fishery Management Council recommends management measures to National Marine Fisheries Service for fisheries off the coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington under its fishery management plans for groundfish, salmon, highly migratory species (such as tunas), and coastal pelagic species (such as sardines and anchovies). The Council is one of eight regional fishery management councils established by the Magnuson Fishery Conservation and Management Act of 1976 to manage fisheries 3-200 miles offshore of the U.S. coastline.

###

On the Web

• Pacific Fishery Management Council: http://www.pcouncil.org
• Season recommendations for 2018 salmon management: https://www.pcouncil.org/?p=53627
• Preseason Report III Council Adopted Management Measures and Environmental Assessment Part 3 will be posted on the Council web page in the near future (on or about April 20).
• Description of 2018 salmon management process: http://www.pcouncil.org/salmon/current-season-management/
• Fact sheet: Salmon: https://tinyurl.com/yatybp6h
• Fact sheet: Common Terms Used in Salmon Management: https://tinyurl.com/ycbo4qbb

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Catch Estimation Methodology Review Meeting to be Held March 28-29 in Santa Cruz, CA

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

The Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council) is sponsoring a meeting to review a new method proposed to improve catch estimation methods in sparsely sampled mixed stock fisheries.  The Catch Estimation Methodology Review meeting is open to the public and may be streamed online as a “listen only” webinar.

The Catch Estimation Methodology Review meeting will commence at 8:30 a.m. PDT, Wednesday, March 28, 2018 and continue until 5 p.m. or as necessary to complete business for the day.  The meeting will reconvene on Thursday, March 29, 2018 starting at 8:30 a.m. PDT and continuing as necessary to complete business for the day.

Agenda

Purpose of the Meeting

The purpose of the Catch Estimation Methodology Review meeting is to review a proposed method for estimating catch of species in sparsely sampled mixed-stock commercial groundfish fisheries.  The methodology proponents have developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate species compositions with accurate measures of uncertainty of historical catches landed in mixed species assemblages or market categories.  Public comments during the meeting will be received from attendees at the discretion of the chair.

Meeting Locations

The Catch Estimation Methodology Review meeting will be held at the following location on March 28:

National Marine Fisheries Service
Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Meeting Room 188
110 McAllister Way
Santa Cruz, California 95060
831-420-3900
Driving Directions

On March 29, the meeting will be held at the following location (next door to the NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center):

The Center for Ocean Health Library, Ocean Health Building Room 201
University of California Santa Cruz
115 McAllister Way
Santa Cruz, California 95060
Driving Directions

Listen-Only Webinar Option

Although this meeting will be conducted as an in-person meeting, there may also be a “listen-only” webinar option.

  1. To attend the “listen-only” webinar, visit:
    http://www.gotomeeting.com/online/webinar/join-webinar
  2. Enter the Webinar ID: 942-468-499
  3. Please enter your name and email -address (required)
  4. You may use your computer speakers or headset to listen.  If you do not have a headset or speakers, you may use your telephone to listen to the meeting by dialing this TOLL number +1 (415) 930-5321 
  5. Enter the Attendee phone audio access code  580-006-830.

Technical Information: System Requirements

  • PC-based attendees: Required: Windows® 7, Vista, or XP
  • Mac®-based attendees: Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer
  • Mobile attendees: Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet (See the GoToMeeting Webinar Apps)

NOTES: There will be no technical assistance available for the “listen only” webinar.  If there are technical difficulties, the broadcast may end and may not be restarted.

Additional Information

All visitors to the National Marine Fisheries Service science centers should bring photo identification to the meeting location. Visitors who are foreign nationals (defined as a person who is not a citizen or national of the United States) will require additional security clearance to access the NOAA facilities. Foreign national visitors should contact Ms. Stacey Miller at 541-867-0535 at least two weeks prior to the meeting date to initiate the security clearance process.

The meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt at 503-820-2280, ext. 411 at least ten days prior to the meeting date.

For more information regarding these meetings, please contact Mr. John DeVore at 503-820-2280, ext. 413; toll free 1-866-806-7204.

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Salmon Technical Team to Hold Work Sessions for 2018

Thursday, December 21st, 2017

The Pacific Fishery Management Council’s (Council) Salmon Technical Team (STT) will hold two work sessions.

January 16-19, 2018:  The STT will meet at the Council office in a public work session to draft “Review of 2017 Ocean Salmon Fisheries, Stock Assessment and Fishery Evaluation Document for the Pacific Coast Salmon Fishery Management Plan” and to consider any other estimation or methodology issues pertinent to the 2018 ocean salmon fisheries.

February 20-23, 2018:  The STT will meet at the Council office in a public work session to draft “Preseason Report I-Stock Abundance Analysis and Environmental Assessment Part 1 for 2018 Ocean Salmon Fishery Regulations” and to consider any other estimation or methodology issues pertinent to the 2018 ocean salmon fisheries.

The two work sessions will be held at the following location:

Pacific Fishery Management Council
Large Conference Room
7700 NE Ambassador Place, Suite 101
Portland, OR 97220-1384
503-820-2280
Driving Directions

This meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt at 503-820-2411 at least ten business days prior to the meeting date.

For further information about the work sessions, please contact Ms. Robin Ehlke at 503-820-2410; toll-free 1-866-806-7204.

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Highly Migratory Species Management Team to Meet January 22-24 (NOW A WEBINAR)

Thursday, December 21st, 2017

The Pacific Fishery Management Council’s (Council’s) Highly Migratory Species Management Team (HMSMT) will hold a meeting from Monday, January 22 to Wednesday, January 24, 2018, which is open to the public.  This meeting will start at 8:30 a.m. and continue until business is concluded on each day.

The purpose of the HMSMT meeting is to finalize a preliminary analysis of the range of alternatives for authorizing a fishery using deep-set buoy gear adopted by the Pacific Council in September 2017.  The HMSMT will provide the draft analysis at the Pacific Council’s March 2018 meeting.  At that meeting the Council is scheduled to further refine the alternatives as needed and adopt a preliminary preferred alternative, if possible.  The HMSMT may also discuss updates to the HMS Stock Assessment and Fishery Evaluation document and HMS-related matters scheduled on future Council agendas.

Meeting Location

Room 3400, Third Floor
Glenn M. Anderson Federal Building
501 W. Ocean Blvd.
Long Beach, CA 90802
Driving Directions

Meeting Agenda

Additional information

Public comments during the meeting will be received from attendees at the discretion of the HMSMT chair.

The meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt at 503-820-2411, at least ten days prior to the meeting date.

For further information about the meeting, please contact Dr. Kit Dahl at 503-820-2422; toll-free 1-866-806-7204.

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

PRELIMINARY NOVEMBER DRAFT MOTIONS IN WRITING

Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

Cautionary Note — These preliminary motions do not represent the final official administrative record. The motions and amendments contained in this blog are as projected on the screen at the Council meeting at the time of the Council vote and often use expedited language and references without the benefit of any final editing or proofing. They may use short-hand language or abbreviations that may not be clear without the context of verbal comments and clarifications made during their development at the meeting, or may contain inadvertent transposition errors. They have not been approved by the Council to represent the final official record of Council action. The final official record will be posted on the Council website after the Council approves the full meeting record at a future Council meeting.

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Groundfish Electronic Monitoring Technical and Policy Advisory Committees to Hold Webinar September 6

Wednesday, August 9th, 2017

The Pacific Fishery Management Council’s (Pacific Council) Ad Hoc Trawl Groundfish Electronic Monitoring Technical Advisory Committee and Groundfish Electronic Monitoring Policy Advisory Committee (GEM Committees) will hold a joint work session via webinar, which is open to the public.  The webinar meeting will be held September 6, 2017, from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. (Pacific Daylight Time) or when business for each day has been completed.

The GEM Committees will discuss items on the Pacific Council’s September 2017 meeting agenda with the discussions focused on, but not limited to, Electronic Monitoring (EM) – Preliminary Pacific Halibut Discard Mortality Rates and Third-Party Review.  The GEM Committees may also address one or more of the Council’s scheduled Administrative Matters.  The Committees will discuss analytical results of halibut discard mortality rates as observed under the Pacific Council’s electronic monitoring program for the limited entry groundfish non-whiting midwater trawl and bottom trawl fisheries when fishing under the non-trawl shorebased individual fishing quota program.  In addition, the Committees will discuss policy implications of the Council’s preferred alternative for the industry to use solely the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission as the EM review provider when the program is implemented in regulation.

Webinar Materials

To Attend the Webinar

  1. Join the meeting by visiting this link:
    https://www.gotomeeting.com/meeting/join-meeting
  2. Enter the Webinar ID: 405-536-325
  3. Please enter your name and email address (required)
  4. You must use your telephone for the audio portion of the meeting by dialing this TOLL number: 1+ (872) 240-3412 (not a toll-free number)
  5. Enter the Attendee phone audio access code: 405-536-325
  6. Enter your audio phone pin (shown after joining the webinar)

Technical Information and System Requirements

  • PC-based attendees: Required: Windows® 7, Vista, or XP
  • Mac®-based attendees: Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer
  • Mobile attendees: Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet GoToMeeting Webinar Apps)

You may send an email to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt or contact him at 503-820-2280, extension 411 for technical assistance.

Public Listening Station

A public listening station will also be provided at the Council office.

Pacific Fishery Management Council
7700 NE Ambassador Place, Suite 101
Portland, OR 97220-1384
503-820-2280
Driving Directions

Additional information

Public comments during the webinar will be received from attendees at the discretion of the GEM Committee chairs.

This meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt at 503-280-2411 at least ten days prior to the meeting date.

If you have additional questions regarding the webinar, please contact Mr. Brett Wiedoff at 503-820-2424; toll-free 1-866-806-7204; ext. 424.

SHARE THIS:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail