Groundfish blog

The Council has reopened solicitation for nominations to the vacant Groundfish Advisory Subpanel Washington Private Sport Seat

Monday, April 18th, 2016

The Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) is requesting nominations of qualified candidates to fill the vacant Washington Private Recreational seat on its Groundfish Advisory Subpanel (GAP) for the 2016-2018 advisory body term. The position is for the remainder of a three-year term ending December 31, 2018. Appointments will be made at the June 23-28, 2016 Council meeting in Tacoma, Washington. To ensure consideration, nominations should be received at the Council office no later than Thursday, May 26, 2016.

Please visit the Council’s “Current Advisory Body Vacancies” webpage for further information, including instructions on how to submit nominations.

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Council Adopts Preliminary Preferred Management Measures for 2017-2018

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

Final Harvest Specifications

The Council adopted final preferred harvest specifications for 2017-2018 as outlined in http://tinyurl.com/z92znz5, Table 1, except:

  • Canary rockfish: 1,526 mt annual catch limit (ACL) in 2017-18 with ACL = ABC (acceptable biological catch) (P* = 0.45) thereafter;
  • Darkblotched rockfish: 490 mt in 2017-18;
  • California scorpionfish: 150 mt constant catch ACL;
  • Widow rockfish: ACL = ABC (P* = 0.45); 13,508 mt and 12,655 mt in 2017 and 2018, respectively; and
  • Blue rockfish harvest specifications would also include deacon rockfish.

Preliminary Preferred Management Measures

The Council adopted the following adjustments to management measures for public review

  • Updates to selected rockfish conservation area coordinates in California (See http://tinyurl.com/gle923s in Section B.1.1)
  • Deductions to the final preferred ACLs to account for groundfish mortality in Tribal, exempted fishing permit, non-groundfish fisheries (also called incidental open access), and research activities. The 2017 research set-asides for yelloweye rockfish were reduced by 0.6 mt; total research set-asides for all projects would be equal to 2.7 mt. Additionally, the tribal set-aside for canary rockfish was increased to 50 mt to facilitate analysis of impacts. Final tribal set-asides will be adopted in June
  • Preliminary annual catch targets (ACT) for cowcod (4 mt) and California scorpionfish (111 mt)
  • All management measures for blue rockfish shall be specified as blue/deacon rockfish

The Council adopted the following preliminary preferred harvest guidelines (HG) for species managed within a complex

  • Blackgill rockfish within the Slope Rockfish complex south of 40°10´ N. latitude in 2017 (120.2 mt). In the event Amendment 26, which proposes to manage blackgill south of 40°10´ N. latitude with stock-specific harvest specifications, is delayed, then implement a 122.4 mt blackgill rockfish HG within the Slope Rockfish complex south of 40°10´ N. latitude in 2018
  • Blue rockfish south of 42° N. latitude within the Nearshore Rockfish complexes north and south of 40°10´ N. latitude (304.6 mt in 2017, 311.2 mt for 2018)

Preliminary preferred trawl and non-trawl allocations were also adopted for

  • Bocaccio: trawl (39 percent) and non-trawl (61 percent) allocation
  • Cowcod: trawl (36 percent) and non-trawl (64 percent) allocation
  • Yelloweye rockfish: trawl (8 percent) and non-trawl (92 percent) allocation
  • Canary rockfish: in lieu of allocations, implement ACTs of 72 percent to the trawl sectors (1,060.1 mt) and 28 percent (406.5 mt) to the non-trawl sectors
  • Big skate: trawl (95 percent) and non-trawl (5 percent) allocation
  • Longnose skate: trawl (90 percent) and non-trawl (10 percent) allocation
  • Shelf Rockfish north 40°10´ N. latitude: trawl (60.2 percent) and non-trawl (39.8 percent) allocation
  • Shelf Rockfish south 40°10´ N. latitude: trawl (12.2 percent) and non-trawl (87.8 percent) allocation

The Council also adopted preliminary within non-trawl HG or shares for bocaccio south of 40°10´ N. latitude, canary, cowcod, and yelloweye as follows

2017

Bocaccio Canary Cowcod Yelloweye
Non-Trawl Allocationa/ 476.5 406.5 2.6 13.1
Non-Nearshore 145.6 46.5 0.8
Nearshore Fixed Gear 1.8 100 2.1
Washington Recreational HG 0.0 50 3.3
Oregon Recreational HG 0.0 75 3.0
California Recreational HG 329.1 135 3.9

2018

Bocaccio Canary Cowcod Yelloweye
Non-Trawl Totala/ 446.6 406.5 2.6 12.9
Non-Nearshore 136.4 46.5 0.7
Nearshore Fixed Gear 1.7 100 2.0
Washington Recreational HG 0.0 50 3.3
Oregon Recreational HG 0.0 75 3.0
California Recreational HG 308.4 135 3.9

a/ The values for canary would be specified as ACTs. The values for bocaccio, cowcod, and yelloweye would be non-trawl allocations.

  • Within the non-trawl sector, blackgill rockfish south of 40°10′ N. latitude will be divided 60 percent to limited entry and 40 percent to open access in 2017-2018
    • In 2017, the blackgill south of 40°10′ N. latitude non-trawl HG (44.5 mt) would provide 26.7 mt for limited entry and 17.8 mt to open access fixed gears
    • If Amendment 26 is implemented in 2018, then the blackgill south of 40°10′ N. latitude non-trawl allocation (72.2 mt) would provide 43.3 mt to limited entry and 28.9 mt to open access fixed gears
    • If Amendment 26 is not implemented in 2018, then the blackgill south of 40°10′ N. latitude non-trawl HG (45.3 mt) would provide 27.2 mt for limited entry and 18.1 mt to open access fixed gears
  • For sablefish south of 36º N. latitude, provide 70 percent to limited entry and 30 percent to open access fixed gears
Year Regulation Values Modeling Targets (includes est. discard)
Non-Trawl Allocation LE Share OA Share Non-Trawl Share LE Landed Catch Share OA Landed Catch Share
2017 621 434 186 598 419 179
2018 647 453 194 623 436 187

 

  • For Nearshore Rockfish North of 40°10´ N. latitude, the Council adopted the following state-specific shares for 2017-2018
    • Option 2 in Table 4-8 of http://tinyurl.com/jnjqtz7: WA (16.9 mt), OR (46.1 mt), and CA (40.2 mt)
    • The California share would be a Federal HG, whereas Washington and Oregon would be tracked in a state process

 

Shorebased IFQ Program

Allocations based on final preferred ACLs, Amendment 21 allocations, a two-year canary ACT, and a two-year bocaccio allocation. The daily vessel limit, designed for overfished species, for canary rockfish would be removed, given that the stock is rebuilt. Trip limits for non-IFQ species would be the same as in 2016, except for big skate.

Big skate trip limits coastwide for shorebased IFQ fishery for 2017-2018.

JAN-FEB MAR-APR MAY-JUN JUL-AUG SEP-OCT NOV-DEC
5,000 lbs./2 months 25,000 lbs./2 months 30,000 lbs./2 months 35,000 lbs./2 months 10,000 lbs./2 months 5,000 lbs./2 months

Trawl Rockfish Conservation Area (RCA) would have the same configuration as in 2016, except that north of 48°10’ N. latitude the shoreward boundary would be 100 fm and the seaward boundary would be 150 fm.

At-Sea

The Council adopted preliminary preferred allocations based on final preferred ACLs, Amendment 21 allocations, two-year allocations for canary rockfish, and set-asides (see Table 4-20 in http://tinyurl.com/jnjqtz7).

 

Catcher-Processor Allocations (mt)

Species 2017 2018
Canary 16 16
Darkblotched 13.5 13.5
Pacific Ocean perch 10.2 10.2
Widow rockfish 411.2 384.8

Mothership Allocations (mt)

Species 2017 2018
Canary 30 30
Darkblotched 9.5 9.5
Pacific Ocean perch 7.2 7.2
Widow rockfish 290.3 271.6

Non-Nearshore

The non-trawl RCA seaward boundary from 40°10´ to 34°27´ N. latitude would be moved from 150 to 125 fm. The same trip limits as in 2016 would be in place for 2017-2018 except for the following.

Sablefish

North of 36° N. latitude for limited entry and open access fixed gears for 2017-2018.

Fishery Jan-Feb Mar-Apr May-Jun July-Aug Sept-Oct Nov-Dec
LE 1,125 lbs/week, not to exceed 3,375 lbs bimonthly
OA 300 lbs/day, or one landing per week up to 1,400 lbs, not to exceed 2,800 lbs bimonthlya/

a/ Preliminary modeling indicates that these limits will exceed the OA sablefish share; reduced trip limits are expected for the June Briefing Book.

South of 36° N. latitude for limited entry and open access fixed gears.

Fishery Jan-Feb Mar-Apr May-Jun July-Aug Sept-Oct Nov-Dec
Limited Entry 1,700 lbs/week
Open Access 300 lbs/day, or one landing per week up to 1,600 lbs.,

not to exceed 3,200 lbs. bimonthly

Blackgill rockfish:  For 2017, implement the same trip limits for limited entry and open access as in 2016.  For 2018, assuming Amendment 26 is implemented, develop new trip limit projections based on 2,000 lbs/2 months for limited entry and 800 lbs/2 months for open access. These trip limits are higher than the 2016 trip limits but lower than the options presented in Table 4-28 in http://tinyurl.com/jnjqtz7.  If Amendment 26 is not implemented in 2018, the proposed limit of 2,000 lbs/2 months is estimated to exceed the limited entry share. The 800 lbs/2 months for open access is estimated to be within the open access share even if Amendment 26 is not implemented. The 2016 trip limits for limited entry and open access are expected to stay within the shares if Amendment 26 is not implemented in 2018.

Bocaccio

Limited entry south of 40°10′ N. latitude

Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period 4 Period 5 Period 6
40°10′ – 34°27′ 1,000 lb / 2 mo
South of 34°27′ 1,500 lb CLOSED 1,500 lb / 2 mo

Open access south of 40°10′ N. latitude

Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period 4 Period 5 Period 6
South of 40°10′ 500 lb CLOSED 500 lb / 2 mo

Remove bocaccio from the aggregate trip limit between 40°10′ N. latitude and 34°27′ N. latitude to reduce discarding as the stock continues to rebuild and encounters increase.

Canary rockfish: Trip limits of 300 lbs/2 months for limited entry and 150 lbs/2 months for open access.

Yellowtail rockfish: 1,000 lbs/month for limited entry and 500 lbs/month for open access.

Shelf rockfish: Open access between 40°10′ N. latitude and 34°27′ N. latitude

Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period 4 Period 5 Period 6
400 lb CLOSED 400 lb / 2 mo

Nearshore

The non-trawl RCA shoreward boundary would be moved from 60 to 75 fm south of 34°27′ N. latitude. The same trip limits as in 2016 would apply, except:

Canary trip limits: 300 lbs/2 months for limited entry and 150 lbs/2 months for open access coastwide.

Black rockfish, LE and OA: 7,000 lbs/2 months for both limited entry and open access in California between 42° N. latitude and 40°10′ N. latitude.

California scorpionfish:

Limited entry and open access bi-monthly trip limits (lbs.) for California scorpionfish.

Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period 4 Period 5 Period 6
1,500 lb Closed 1,500 lb / 2 mo

Tribal

The Council adopted preliminary preferred tribal measures that are the same as in 2016, except that

  • Sablefish discard mortality would be reduced from 1.6 to 1.5 percent
  • Midwater trawl: Treaty midwater trawl fishermen will be restricted to a total catch of 1,000 mt of yellowtail rockfish for the entire fleet. Widow rockfish will be managed not to exceed 200 mt for the entire fleet
  • For Dover sole, English sole, Other Flatfish, and arrowtooth flounder, trip limits will be established in tribal regulation only and adjusted in-season to stay within the overall harvest targets and overfished species limits
  • For canary rockfish, the tribal fisheries will be managed to the tribal set-aside, which will be determined before the June 2016 Council meeting

Washington Recreational

The Council adopted preliminary preferred measures that are the same as in 2016, except:

Bag Limits and Sub-limits

  • Marine Catch Areas 1 and 2: Aggregate bag limit of 12 groundfish which includes a sub-limit of 10 rockfish, including up to 1 canary rockfish, 2 lingcod, and 2 cabezon (i.e., status quo with additional canary rockfish sub-limit).
  • Retention of up to 2 canary rockfish would be considered in 2018 for all areas.

 

Recreational Season Dates

  • Marine Catch Areas 1, 2, and 3: Bottomfish and lingcod seasons would open on the second Saturday in March and continue through the third Saturday in October. The lingcod season would be revised to be the same as the bottomfish season.  The status quo lingcod season is open the Saturday closest to March 15, through the Saturday closest to October 15.
  • Marine Catch Area 4: Bottomfish season would open on the second Saturday in March and continue through the third Saturday in October; lingcod season would remain status quo (i.e., April 16 through October 15).

 

Deepwater Lingcod Closure

  • Marine Catch Area 1: Revise the current deepwater lingcod closure by moving the southern boundary northward five nautical miles. Specifically, fishing for, retention, or possession of lingcod is prohibited seaward of a line connecting the following coordinates: 47°70´ N. latitude, 124°45.00´ W. longitude (Queets River), to 47°38.17´ N. latitude, 124°30.00´ W. longitude, to 47°38.17´ N. latitude, 124°21.00´ W. longitude, to  46°33.00´N. latitude, 124°21.00´ W. longitude.

Oregon Recreational

The Council adopted preliminary preferred measures that are the same as in 2016, except

  • The kelp greenling minimum size limit (10 inches) would be removed
  • Coordinates would be published in regulation for expanding the Stonewall Bank Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation Area, if necessary (see http://tinyurl.com/jnjqtz7 in Table 4-59)

New Management Measures

California Recreational

The Council adopted the following preliminary preferred recreational RCA configuration and season structures. Compared to the 2016 season structure, the proposal for 2017-2018 would provide increased opportunities in almost all areas.  The California scorpionfish season is proposed to be the same as in 2016, which is closed from September to December.

 Bag Limits

The same limits as in 2016 were selected as the preliminary preferred measures, except for the following:

  • Black Rockfish – decrease the sub-bag limit from five fish to three fish statewide to keep projected mortality within allowable impacts
  • Bocaccio – eliminate the sub-bag limit and allow retention of up to 10 fish within the rockfish, cabezon, and greenling complex (RCG) bag limit to provide more opportunity for anglers and reduce discarding
  • Canary Rockfish – allow retention of one canary rockfish within the overall 10 fish RCG bag limit to reduce discards while preventing canary from becoming a target species
  • Lingcod – reduce the lingcod bag limit to two fish statewide in light of recreational harvest levels since 2013

New Management Measures (See http://tinyurl.com/gle923s)

  • New inseason process outside a Council meeting to control catch of black, canary, and yelloweye rockfishes in the California commercial and recreational fisheries (Section B.2.5)
  • Nine new overfished species hotspot closures (Section B.2.6)
  • Allow petrale sole and starry flounder to be retained, along with species in the Other Flatfish complex, at any depth during the seasonal depth closures (Section B.2.7)

New Management Measures to be Considered Outside the Biennial Specifications Process

The Council also forwarded two new management measures to be considered outside the biennial specifications process but implemented in 2017-2018. The Council is considering the following modifications to the within trawl Amendment 21 allocations for darkblotched and Pacific Ocean perch (POP) for 2017-2018.

2017-2018 Amendment 21 Allocations (mt) with Proposed Modifications in Parenthesis

Trawl Allocation Shorebased IFQ Catcher-Processor Mothership
Darkblotched – 2017 & 2018 439.6 416.7 (394.6) 13.5 (25) 9.5 (20)
POP – 2017 139.3 121.9 (104.3) 10.2 (20) 7.2 (15)
POP – 2018 144.0 126.6 (109.0) 10.2 (20) 7.2 (15)

Additionally, the Council is considering changing the catch control mechanism for darkblotched and POP from formal allocations to the at-sea sectors to set-asides. Set-asides are not formal allocations, but they are amounts which are not available to the other fisheries during the fishing year.  Set-asides are managed on an annual basis unless there is a risk of a harvest specification being exceeded, unforeseen impact on other fisheries, or conservation concerns, in which case inseason action may be taken. Set-asides may be adjusted through the biennial specifications and management measures process as necessary. The Council is scheduled to discuss these proposals at the June 2016 Council meeting, with final action scheduled for September 2016.

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Sam Rauch, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Regulatory Programs of NOAA Fisheries, Visits Council on Anniversary of MSA

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

Sam Rauch, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Regulatory Programs of NOAA Fisheries, visited the Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting today to observe the 40th anniversary of Federal fisheries management under the Magnuson-Stevens Act and to discuss ongoing programs of National Marine Fisheries Service. The Magnuson-Stevens Act, or MSA, is the foundation of fisheries management in the United States, and was enacted on April 13, 1976. The MSA created eight Regional Fishery Management Councils that support transparent regional management of the nation’s fisheries.

“The strength of the MSA is that it created the Council system, which has worked extraordinarily well in terms of making sure that decisions are transparent, are science-based and have stakeholder input,” said Rauch. “It allows us to make deliberative decisions together, as opposed to in a black box. It is what has built the success that we have enjoyed. In the last few years we have consistently had either record or near-record landings, nationally. At the same time, we have also made significant strides in reducing the number of stocks that are on the overfished list, and that are subject to overfishing. Those continue to be at either all-time lows or near all-time lows. [The status of fish stocks] is something the Councils should be proud of, because this is where the hard work happens to make all that possible. The regional Councils are the bodies that make all the tough decisions.”

Rauch went on to discuss NOAA’s draft National Bycatch Reduction Strategy. The proposal continues the nation’s momentum on reducing bycatch—when fishermen catch fish they don’t want, can’t keep, or aren’t allowed to keep. Bycatch can also occur when fishing gear harms or kills marine mammals, seabirds, corals, sponges, sea turtles, or protected fish. NOAA Fisheries is accepting public comment on the draft strategy through June 3.[1]

Rauch also discussed the President’s task force on illegal, unregulated, and unreported fishing. A new NOAA program beginning this fall will track the origin of certain at-risk stocks imported into the United States, leading to a safer and higher quality seafood product for consumers.

Recently, a peer-reviewed study determined that the U.S. fisheries management system meets U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization standards for sustainable fishing. “U.S. fisheries are the best managed in the world,” said Rauch.

[1] http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/fisheries_eco/bycatch/strategy.html

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NOAA Head Dr. Kathryn Sullivan Visits Pacific Council (Press Release)

Saturday, April 9th, 2016

Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), visited the Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) meeting in Vancouver, Washington on April 9, 2016 and addressed the Council.  Please read the full PFMC press release.

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PRELIMINARY DRAFT APRIL 2016 COUNCIL MEETING MOTIONS IN WRITING

Saturday, April 9th, 2016

Cautionary Note — These preliminary motions do not represent the final official administrative record. The motions and amendments contained in this blog are as projected on the screen at the Council meeting at the time of the Council vote and often use expedited language and references without the benefit of any final editing or proofing. They may use short-hand language or abbreviations that may not be clear without the context of verbal comments and clarifications made during their development at the meeting, or may contain inadvertent transposition errors. They have not been approved by the Council to represent the final official record of Council action. The final official record will be posted on the Council website after the Council approves the full meeting record at a future Council meeting.

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April 2016 Council Meeting Internet Live Stream

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

The April 2016 Council meeting will be live‐streamed on the internet during the following hours:

  • Saturday, April 9, 2016:  8:00 AM Pacific Time, ending at approximately 3:00 PM PT  (at approximately 3:00 PM PT, there will be a Closed Executive Session)
  • Sunday, April 10, 2016 through Thursday, April 14, 2016:  8:00 AM Pacific Time, ending daily at approximately 6:00 PM PT or when business for the day is complete

Only the audio portion and presentations displayed on the screen at the Council meeting will be broadcast. The audio portion is listen‐only; you will be unable to speak to the Council via the broadcast.

For agenda item topics, please see the April 2016 agenda.

Join the meeting in “listen-only” mode

Join the meeting in “listen-only” mode by visiting this link:

  1. http://www.gotomeeting.com/online/webinar/join-webinar
  2. Enter the Webinar ID – The April 9-14, 2016 Webinar ID is: 105-442-547
  3. Please enter your email address (required)

Participants can use their computer’s speakers (VoIP) or telephone. (See the PFMC GoToMeeting Audio Diagram for best practices).  Since this is a “listen only” broadcast, you may use your computer speakers or headset to listen.

If you do not have a headset or computer speakers, you may use your telephone for the audio portion of the meeting by dialing this TOLL number 1-646-307-1720; phone audio access code 391-457-815 (not a toll-free number); then enter the audio pin shown after joining the webinar. The webinar is broadcast in “listen only” mode.

Technical Information

System Requirements

  • PC-based attendees: Required: Windows® 7, Vista, or XP
  • Mac®-based attendees: Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer
  • Mobile attendees: Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet (See the GoToMeeting Webinar Apps)

You may send an email to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt for technical assistance.

MP3 Audio Files

Approximately four business days after the meeting has ended, you may visit the “Past Meetings” webpage where you will find links to the MP3 and WAV files.

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Groundfish Management Team to Conduct Webinar

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

The Pacific Fishery Management Council’s (Pacific Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) will hold a webinar that is open to the public on Monday, April 4, 2016 from 1:30 p.m. until business for the day is completed.  The primary purpose of the meeting is to prepare for the April 8-14, 2016 Council meeting in Vancouver, Washington.  Specific agenda topics include a briefing on the groundfish essential fish habitat and Rockfish Conservation Area amendment and the National Marine Fisheries Service report on widow rockfish divestiture and fixed gear sablefish rulemaking.  The GMT may also address other assignments relating to groundfish management.  No management actions will be decided by the GMT.  Public comment will be accommodated if time allows, at the discretion of the GMT Chair.  The GMT’s task will be to develop recommendations for consideration by the Pacific Council at its April meeting.

Agenda

To Attend the Webinar

  1. Join the meeting by visiting this link:
    http://www.gotomeeting.com/online/webinar/join-webinar
  2. Enter the Webinar ID: 137-048-875
  3. Please enter your name and email -address (required)

AFTER logging in to the webinar, please:

  • Dial this TOLL number +1 (415) 930-5321 (not a toll-free number)
  • Enter the Attendee phone audio access code  748-538-268;
  • Then enter your audio phone pin (shown after joining the webinar).

Participants are encouraged to use their telephone, as this is the best practice to avoid technical issues and excessive feedback.  (See the PFMC GoToMeeting Audio Diagram for best practices).

Technical Information and System Requirements

  • PC-based attendees: Required: Windows® 7, Vista, or XP
  • Mac®-based attendees: Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer
  • Mobile attendees: Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet GoToMeeting Webinar Apps)

You may send an email to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt or contact him at 503-820-2280, extension 425 for technical assistance.

Public Listening Station

A public listening station will also be provided at the Council office.

Pacific Fishery Management Council
7700 NE Ambassador Place, Suite 101
Portland, OR 97220-1384
503-820-2280
Driving Directions

Additional information

This meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Mr. Kris Kleinschmidt at 503-280-2425 at least five days prior to the meeting date.

If you have additional questions regarding the webinar, please contact Ms. Kelly Ames at 503-820-2426; toll-free 1-866-806-7204.

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April 2016 Briefing Book Available Online

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

The Briefing Book for the April 2016 Council meeting has been posted to the Council’s website on the “April 2016 Briefing Book” webpage. The Briefing Book contains “situation summaries” (brief summaries that provide background for each agenda item), reports and materials for each agenda item, and written public comment. Advisory body and committee agendas and memos are also available.

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March 2016 Council Decision Summary Document Online

Thursday, March 17th, 2016

The Pacific Fishery Management Council met March 9-14, 2016 in Sacramento, California. The March 2016 Council Meeting Decision Summary Document contains the highlights of significant decisions made at that meeting. Results of agenda items that do not reach a level of highlight significance are typically not described in the Decision Summary Document.

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April 8-14, 2016 Council Meeting Notice and Agenda

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016

The Pacific Fishery Management Council and its advisory bodies will meet April 8‐14, 2016 in Vancouver, Washington, USA to address issues related to salmon, groundfish, coastal pelagic species, enforcement matters, and habitat matters.

Please visit the “Current Council Meeting” webpage for meeting and agenda details.

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